Famly Recipes

The American Woman's Cook Book , Margie Oakes used this cookbook to raise her family.
The American Woman's Cookbook, by Ruth Berolzheimer, was originally published in 1938 by the directors of the College of Home Economics of Cornell University.


Some of the game recipes in the book were shared by nephew, Stuart Oakes, who found a copy in a used book store.

Opposum Roast, Terrapin with Mushrooms, Roast Squirrels, however there is also White Mountain Cake, English Plum Pudding, Rechauffe of Lamb, Timbales of Toast

 

Recipes

 

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  • Grandmother Oakes' 1234 Cake
  • From Stuart Oakes



    Or follow traditional cake making directions, which I grabbed off of the internet.
    In a large bowl, beat butter and sugar with a mixer at medium speed until fluffy, 3 to 4 minutes.
    Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition.
    In a medium bowl, stir together dry ingredients. Gradually add flour mixture to butter mixture alternately with milk, beginning and ending with flour mixture, beating just until combined after each addition.
    Stir in extracts.
    Pour batter into prepared pans (smoothing tops if necessary). Bake until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, 28 to 30 minutes.
    Let cool in pans for 10 minutes. Remove from pans, and let cool completely on wire racks.

    A typical mid-century icing for 1234 cake (from Peggy Flanagan, Joylene's cousin on the Whatley side). Grandmother Oakes certainly at least knew of this icing...it was very popular for coconut cakes.

    Cook sugar, water & Karo until it makes a long string (low heat) (Note: This string will float around in the air).
    Beat egg whites until stiff and slowly add syrup.
    Add vanilla. Beat until icing stands in peaks.
    Double the recipe for a 3 layer cake.
    Tip: measure Karo in spoon first, then pour hot water in spoon and it will wash out the residual corn syrup. Have hot water sitting on a pad on the counter.


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  • Grandmother Oakes's Bread and Butter Pickles

    Ingredients

    4 quarts cucumbers, sliced 1/4 inch thick
    1 1/2 cup onion (or more)
    2 large garlic cloves
    1/3 cup canning salt
    2 quarts ice
    4 1/2 cups sugar
    1 1/2 tsp turmeric
    1 1/2 tsp celery seeds
    2 tablespoons mustard seeds
    3 cups white vinegar

    Slice pickles and onions and garlic. Cover with salt and ice then let stand 3 hours. Discard garlic.
    Bring other ingredients to a boil.
    Add pickles & bring back to a boil. Can per USDA directions.
    Note; Grandmother Oakes would have hot-water canned these for 5 minutes in pint jars. Modern guidelines dictate 10 minutes for pints, 25 minutes for quarts. I find it is best to use pints as the pickles taste fresher not having been boiled for so long.

    Uncle Charlie's Chuckwagon Rice (by way of Azile Logue)
    1/4 medium bell pepper
    1 medium onion, finely chopped
    1/2 jalapeno, finely chopped
    1/4 cup butter, melted.
    1 four ounce cane or 4 oz fresh mushrooms (champignon de Paris)
    1 ten and 1/2 ounce can chicken broth
    1 cup uncooked rice

    Saute onions, bell peppers and jalapeno in butter. Add mushrooms, liquid, and rice. Cover and bake at 350 degrees for 30 to 35 minutes.

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  • Madeleines de Commercy

  • This recipe was brought back from France by Julia Child. It can't be topped--except with Chocolate.


    Ingredients

    2 beaten eggs
    2/3 cup sugar
    1 cup AP flour
    4 oz butter
    pinch of salt
    1/2 tsp vanilla
    zest of 1/2 lemon
    3 drops of lemon juice
    1 tablespoon flour (for the molds)
    1 1/2 tablespoon butter for the madeleine molds

    Bring all ingredients to room temperature.
    Combine flour and sugar, then add 3/4 of the eggs. beat with a spoon into a heavy cream. Rest 10 minutes
    Bring butter to a boil until it begins to brown. (be careful!! it can burn in a heartbeat)
    Cool the melted butter until still liquid.
    Beat the remaining bit of egg into the batter and stir in the cool butter.
    Stir in salt, vanilla, zest, and lemon juice.
    Refrigerate 1 hour.
    Mix the flour and soft butter for the molds together.
    Prepare pans with butter/flour paste and refrigerate.
    Drop batter into cold pans. It is important that everything is very, very cold.
    Bake 375 degrees for 15 minutes. These will have the hump on top if you use the madeleine pans that look like scallops. Don't overfill the pans. You can dip the tips in melted chocolate or dust with powdered sugar.
    Dip in hot tea and write a 1,000 page book about wasting time in your bedroom.

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  • Chicken Paprikash

  • This recipe was sent by Stuart Oakes.

    SERVES 4

    In this rendition of the Hungarian classic, the natural juices of chicken, bell peppers, onion, and tomatoes are released during the
    braising process and then enriched with sour cream to create a dish that’s especially comforting in cold weather. Serve with buttered egg noodles; rice or mashed potatoes are also good options

    Ingredients

    8 (5- to 7-ounce) bone-in chicken thighs, trimmed
    Salt and pepper
    1 teaspoon vegetable oil
    1 large onion, halved and sliced thin
    1 large red bell pepper, stemmed, seeded, halved widthwise, and cut into thin strips
    1 large green bell pepper, stemmed, seeded,
    halved widthwise, and cut into thin strips
    3 1/2 tablespoons paprika
    1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
    1/4 teaspoon dried marjoram
    1/2 cup dry white wine
    1 ( l4.5-ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained
    1/3 cup sour cream
    2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley


    I. Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat oven to 300 degrees. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. Heat oil in Dutch oven over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add 4 chicken highs, skin side down, and cook without moving them until skin is crisp and well browned, about 5 minutes.

    Using tongs, flip chicken and brown on second side,  Transfer to large plate. Add remaining 4 chicken thighs to pot and repeat, then transfer to plate and set aside. Discard all but 1 tablespoon fat from pot.

    2. Add onion to fat left in Dutch oven and sauté over medium heat until softened, 5 to 7 minutes. Add bell peppers and sauté until onions are browned and peppers are softened, about 3 minutes. Stir in 3 tablespoons paprika, flour, and marjoram and cook, stirring constantly, until
    fragrant, about 1  minute. Add wine, scraping pot bottom with wooden spoon to loosen brown bits. Stir in tomatoes and 1 teaspoon salt. Remove and discard skins from chicken thighs, then nestle chicken under onion and peppers and add accumulated juices to pot. Bring to simmer, cover and place pot in oven. Cook until chicken offers no resistance when poked with tip of paring knife, but still clings to bone, about 1 ¼ hours. (Stew can be cooled to room temperature, covered , and refrigerate for up to  3 days. Bring to simmer over medium-low heat   before
    proceeding.)

    3. Combine sour cream and remaining 1/2 tablespoon paprika in small bowl. Remove chicken from pot and place portion on each plate. Stir few tablespoons of hot sauce into sour cream to temper, and then stir mixture back into remaining peppers and sauce. Ladle peppers and enriched sauce over chicken, sprinkle with parsley, and serve immediately.

    WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS
    Chicken paprikash is an easy-to-make braise with succulent chicken, a balance of heat, spice, and aromatics, and a rich, flavorful sauce with paprika at center stage. To get to this goal, we pared down the usual mile-long ingredient list. Sautéing a handful of aromatics and vegetables in the fond led to a rich base for our sauce, which we enhanced with paprika twice: once while sautéing the vegetables to let its flavor bloom, then once again when adding sour cream to finish the dish.

    DITCH THE SKIN Just  as for Chicken Provencal, we ditch the skin after browning to prevent the accumulation of excess fat and a greasy sauce. To do this, grasp the skin from one end of the browned and cooled chicken thighs and simply pull to separate it from the meat.

    Choosing Your Paprika
    The brilliant red powder we call “paprika” comes from dried pods (fruit) of the plant species Capisicum annuum L., the family of peppers that range from sweet bells to the very hottest chilies. Several varieties of this clan are used to produce paprika and as a result there are many different kinds of paprika. We found that chicken paprikash is best flavored with Hungarian sweet paprika. Other sweet paprika can deliver good results but don’t use hot paprika in this dish.

    Temper, Temper If sour scream is added directly to the pot it can curdle—especially when added to a hot sauce made acidic with tomatoes. The tomato acid neutralizes some of the electrical charges on the proteins in sour cream (mostly proteins called casein), causing them to be more prone to clump together (coagulate) and separate (curdle), Tempering the sour cream (stirring some of the hot liquid from the stew pot together with the sour cream in a small bowl, then adding the warmed mixture to the pot.) helps to prevent curdling, however. This is because the addition of a small amount of the warm liquid dilutes the protein in the sour cream and gradually brings them all up to temperature.  Any extra fat in the cooking liquid also helps to coat the proteins and prevent them from clumping.
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  • Turnip Greens Soup

  • From Floyd and Betty Oakes.

    Ingredients

    1 Pound Smoked Sausage
    1 Large Onion, Chopped
    1 28 Oz Can Margaret Holmes Seasoned Turnip Greens
    14 ½ to 16 Oz Can Chicken Broth
    10 Oz Can Original Rotel Tomatoes
    14 ½ to 16 Oz Can Blackeye Peas
    14 ½ to 16 Oz Can Navy Beans
    14 ½ to 16 Oz Can Great Northern Beans

    Cook sausage and onion to soften onion. Add remaining ingredients and simmer 30 minutes or so.

    NOTE:  Conecuh brand sausage works well and is available at WalMart. Because the turnip greens are very salty, I usually drain and rinse two cans of the beans to cut down on salt. You could also use reduced sodium chicken broth if desired.

     

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  • Glazed Bleu Cheese Meatballs and Wild Rice with Mushrooms

  • This recipe is for those who love the combination of blue cheese and beef. Serve as an entree with rice or mashed potatoes, or make them a smaller size and keep them warm in a crockpot as an appetizer at your next party.

    Meatballs:

    Ingredients

    1 pound lean ground beef
    1/2 cup crumbled blue cheese
    1 tablespoon sliced green onions
    1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon seasoned salt
    1/4 cup butter
    1/2 cup whipping cream
    Chopped parsley

    Combine beef with blue cheese, onion, Worcestershire sauce, salt and seasoned salt. Shape into 12 meatballs.

    Melt butter in a skillet. Add meatballs and brown on all sides. Cover skillet. Cook over low heat for 5 minutes. Remove meatballs with a slotted spoon and put them in a serving dish. Add cream to drippings. Cook over medium to high heat, stirring, for about 2 minutes or until sauce is satiny. Spoon glaze over meatballs and sprinkle with parsley. Serve immediately.

    Glazed Blue Cheese Meatballs PDF for Printing


  • Wild Rice with Mushrooms:
  • Serve with meatballs or as a side dish for roasts or broiled salmon. Halve the recipe ingredients for two servings, or double the ingredients for eight servings.

    2/3 cup uncooked wild rice
    2 cups boiling water
    1/4 cup butter
    1 tablespoon finely chopped green onion
    1 tablespoon minced parsley
    1 tablespoon minced chives
    1 tablespoon minced green bell pepper
    1/2 pound fresh mushrooms
    1 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    Dash of nutmeg

    Wash wild rice in four changes of water; drain. Add rice to boiling water. Cook, covered, at a simmer for 45 minutes, or until the rice has absorbed all the liquid. Set aside.

    Melt the butter. Add the onion, parsley, chives and green pepper. Cook over low heat for 3 minutes, stirring. Add whole mushrooms and sauté over
    medium heat for 5 minutes. frequently stirring. Combine cooked wild rice and the vegetable mixture. Add salt, pepper and a dash of nutmeg. Toss lightly to blend.

    Wild Rice PDF for Printing


  • Coffee Souffle:
  • This recipe comes from a recipe book my Grandmother Winter made for me for Christmas in 1956.  Grampa loved coffee ice cream and all sorts of coffee desserts—including that classic New England “don’t waste anything” dessert—coffee jello (served with whipped cream, of course!)

    Ingredients

    1 ½ C infusion or drip coffee, or use 2 rounding tsp. instant coffee in 1 ½ C hot water,
    ½ C milk,
    2/3 C sugar,
    ¼ tsp. salt,
    3 eggs, separated,,
    ½ tsp. vanilla,
    1 tbsp. Knox gelatin.
               
    Mix coffee infusion, milk, ½  of sugar and gelatin, heat in a double boiler. 
    Add remaining sugar, salt, egg yolks (slightly beaten), and cook about 5 minutes or until slightly thickened. 
    Remove from stove, add egg whites (stiffly beaten) and vanilla. 
    Serve very cold with cream.

    Coffee Souffle PDF for Printing